Indiana's Core Transfer Library

The Core Transfer Library (CTL) is a listing of courses that will transfer to all Indiana public college and university campuses in one of two ways:

  1. The CTL course will receive credit for the designated equivalent course at the transfer campus and meet the transfer campus degree program requirements in an equivalent manner, or
  2. If there is no agreed- upon directly equivalent course, the CTL course will transfer as an elective requirement of the undergraduate degree program provided the program has room for elective credits. CTL transferability is contingent upon a student earning a C grade or higher in the transfer course. These courses are indicated in the Vincennes University catalog and schedule with the transferIN attribute.

For more information on the CTL and a listing of current CTL courses, go to www.transferin.net.

Transferring to a Four Year School Transferring to a Four Year School

TSAP

Several majors at Vincennes University are designed for you to transfer to a four year school to earn your bachelor's degree. By earning your two-year degree at VU and then transferring, you can save thousands in tuition! You will also have the VU advantages of smaller classes, free tutoring, and experienced faculty who focus on teaching and learning.

Single Articulation Pathways - Credit Transfer Information from the State of Indiana

In 2013 the Indiana legislature enacted Senate Enrolled Act 182, which established the requirements for a Transfer Single Articulation Pathway (TSAP).  The Pathways are competency-based degree tracks designed to help students seamlessly transfer their completed associates degree program course credits into a public baccalaureate degree program. TSAP programs consist of 30 or more credit hours of program coursework and 30 credit hours of general education (known as the Statewide Transfer General Education Core).

VU has participated in the development of TSAP agreements for the following programs (TSAPs). Those were:

So, what does all of that mean for students and parents? 
TSAPs allow a student who completes an associate degree at Vincennes University in one of these majors to articulate with related baccalaureate degrees at all four year state educational institutions that offer the baccalaureate degrees. As long as a student completes courses with the needed grades and grade point average, the credits earned for the associate degree should enable the student to begin at the receiving institution as a junior. It's important that students work closely with their advisor in order that they complete all the required coursework with the necessary grades.

In simple terms, 60 credits of your two year degree in the majors listed above should transfer to Indiana University, Purdue University, Ball State University, Indiana State University, University of Southern Indiana, IUPUI, or other Indiana four-year schools, and you should enter the four-year school as a junior. Vincennes University has many articulation agreements with private schools as well. 

What's an articulation agreement?
Articulation Agreements are formal agreements (or some would call a partnership) between two or more Colleges and Universities documenting the transfer policies for a specific academic program or degree in general.  

Agreements can cover one, two or more years of study and save thousands of dollars in tuition and fees by design. Articulation agreements are transfer agreements to simplify the complexity of determining what courses to take.  They should eliminate the guess work regarding transferability. Following articulation agreements should save students time and money- an important benefit when coping with the escalating cost of higher education alternatives. (http://www.collegetransfer.net)

Bottom line? 
When researching which college is the right choice for you, be sure to ask how your credits transfer. Or if you want to toss around a cool phrase, ask about articulation agreements and if your major is a TSAP. You should also know that successfully completing the TSAP is not a guarantee of admission to a particular state educational institution and program.